Dramatic rescue sees buildier winched 75 feet into the air to get him to safety

Monday 12th November – 8.15pm – Murray MacGregor.

 

Two men have been taken to hospital after the ‘cherry-picker’ they were working on overturned at Frankley Waterworks.

 

The incident happened at shortly after 8.25am on Monday morning in a building site which is creating a very large new water tank.


A paramedic officer, an ambulance and the Hazardous Area Response Team attended the scene.


A West Midlands Ambulance Service spokesman said: “The builders were just about to pour concrete at the site when the accident happened. 

 

“One man, who was in his 40’s was treated for a bump to his head, but a second, who was in his fifties, had leg and back pain.

 

“Due to the location the only way to get him out was to use a crane at the site.  The man was immobilised using a specialist stretcher.  This patient and one of the HART Team paramedic were then lifted over 75 feet into the air from the location and then transported to the waiting ambulance by the crane on site.

 

“Both men were then taken to Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham.”

 

 

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Dramatic rescue sees buildier winched 75 feet into the air to get him to safety

Monday 12th November – 8.15pm – Murray MacGregor.

 

Two men have been taken to hospital after the ‘cherry-picker’ they were working on overturned at Frankley Waterworks.

 

The incident happened at shortly after 8.25am on Monday morning in a building site which is creating a very large new water tank.


A paramedic officer, an ambulance and the Hazardous Area Response Team attended the scene.


A West Midlands Ambulance Service spokesman said: “The builders were just about to pour concrete at the site when the accident happened. 

 

“One man, who was in his 40’s was treated for a bump to his head, but a second, who was in his fifties, had leg and back pain.

 

“Due to the location the only way to get him out was to use a crane at the site.  The man was immobilised using a specialist stretcher.  This patient and one of the HART Team paramedic were then lifted over 75 feet into the air from the location and then transported to the waiting ambulance by the crane on site.

 

“Both men were then taken to Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham.”

 

 

Ends

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Six taken to hospital suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning

Monday 12th November 2012 – 7.40pm – Murray MacGregor.

 

Six people, including a young child, have been taken to hospital after suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning at a house in Wolverhampton.

 

A 999 call was received from the property in Swinford Road at around 4.50pm this afternoon (Monday)

 

A total of five  ambulances, the Hazardous Area Response Team (HART) and a paramedic officer were sent to the scene.

 

A West Midlands Ambulance Service spokesman said: “All six of the patients displayed the classic symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning ; they were complaining of sore eyes and throat, had been vomiting and had reduced levels of consciousness.

 

“The HART team used their specialised equipment to check the house for carbon monoxide and also to see the levels of carbon monoxide poisoning in each patient.

 

“The five adults, two men and three women, who ranged in age from their 20s to 80s all showed low levels of carbon monoxide in their blood, but high levels in their breathing.  The two year old boy displayed similar readings.

 

“Fortunately this suggests that they had not been exposed to the potentially fatal gas for too long and will hopefully all make a full recovery.

 

“They were all taken outside and given oxygen to help them recover before being taken to New Cross Hospital for extended monitoring.”

 

 

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Ambulance_at_night

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Orphan medicines: special treatment required?

This report was prompted by concerns that patients and their clinicians are not always able to access medicines for those with rare diseases. Ongoing reforms to the NHS and the development of a strategy for rare disease offer an opportunity to consider access to medicines for those with orphan or ultra-orphan conditions. This report provides an analysis of the complex framework that influences patients’ access to orphan drugs, focusing on the role of R&D, regulatory and payer/commissioner decisions, and the links between decision making along the pathway to access. It makes suggestions for better decision making and how to improve access to such drugs more widely.

Evaluation of the Equality Delivery System (EDS) for the NHS – phase one: final report

This report marks the first anniversary of the launch of the EDS by the Equality and Diversity Council, chaired by Sir David Nicholson. The report's evaluation examines on the implementation of the EDS across NHS organisations in England, undertaken between January and August 2012 and involving over 200 organisations. The evaluation, along with the accompanying compendium of case studies, highlights what has worked well in implementing the EDS and where lessons can be learnt to ensure that system is making a real difference for patients and the NHS workforce. 

Strategic clinical networks: single operating framework

This framework aims to strengthen continuity of care across a wide spectrum of health conditions. The new model set to be in place by April 2013 brings together management support and clinical leadership for mental health, dementia, neurological conditions, maternity and children, cancer and cardiovascular services. This will contribute to the overarching purpose of the clinical networks, which is for clinicians to gather and share insight into treating complex conditions, and offer treatment across a number of settings.

Joint fire and ambulance stations across the West Midlands

Monday 12th November – 2.35pm – Chris Kowalik.

 

West Midlands Fire and Ambulance Services have formally agreed to share a number of fire station sites in a move which will see more collaborative working between the two organisations.

 

It will mean that West Midlands Ambulance Service staff will be able to make use of some fire station facilities.

 

The agreement was formally signed during the West Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust Board meeting at Handsworth Community Fire Station on Wednesday 31st October.  Ambulances and rapid response vehicles will be based at 34 West Midlands Fire Service sites including its Headquarters in Vauxhall Road, Birmingham.

 

Steve Vincent, Head of Community Safety at West Midlands Fire Service, said: “At a time when both organisations are under severe financial pressure, it makes sense to share some of our sites and facilities. 

 

“The arrangement means we are able to provide even better value for money to the taxpayer while maintaining the high standards of service that the communities we serve expect.  We work together on the ground, so sharing some office space is a beneficial extension of that.”

 

The initiative will also enable West Midlands Ambulance Service to provide a faster response to an incident, because the number of bases ambulances can use will have increased dramatically.

 

Assistance Ambulance Chief Officer Tracey Morrell said: “This shows how far we, as emergency services, have come in co-habiting. Staff from both services have embraced the concept and it is working well. Ambulance service staff enjoy it because they have nice surroundings and have developed a rapport with their fire service colleagues.”

 

The move is part of West Midlands Ambulance Service’s ‘Make Ready’ project. ‘Make Ready’ was implemented by the former Staffordshire Ambulance Service more than ten years ago, making it one of the most successful ambulance services with some of the fastest response times in England. 

 

The Make Ready programme involves the creation of 24/7 fleet maintenance hubs (in Willenhall, Dudley, West Bromwich, Northfield, Erdington and Coventry) where dedicated teams of Ambulance Fleet Assistants prepare, service and maintain the fleet of ambulances. Oncoming ambulance crews collect their ‘made-ready’ vehicle and go to Community Ambulance Stations from where they respond to 999 calls.

 

More community ambulance stations are being established across the West Midlands in addition to the arrangements with West Midlands Fire Service. The details of these will be announced in due course.

 

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Pictured left to right:

Picture 1: Steve Vincent (West Midlands Fire Service), Sir Graham Meldrum (Chairman, West Midlands Ambulance Service), Tracey Morrell (Assistant Chief Ambulance Officer, West Midlands Ambulance Service), Anthony Marsh (Chief Executive, West Midlands Ambulance Service).

Picture 2: Sir Graham Meldrum, Steve Vincent, Anthony Marsh

Picture 3: Steve Vincent, Tracey Morrell

 

Note to Editors:

This press release applies only within the area served by West Midlands Fire Service.

 

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Sale of ambulance station in Birmingham

Monday 12th November – 12.45pm – Chris Kowalik.

 

An ambulance station in Birmingham is to be put up for sale as part of West Midlands Ambulance Service’s ‘Make Ready’ plans that are seeing the creation of dozens of new Community Ambulance Stations across the city.

 

Offers in excess of £1.2m will be invited for the station in Bristol Road, Selly Oak.

 

It is one of nine traditional ambulance stations in the city to be replaced by more than three times the number of new Community Ambulance Stations; lower maintenance and therefore lower cost and greater in number to ensure a faster response to 999 calls.

 

Selly Oak’s new Community Ambulance Station will be based at Bournbrook Fire Station (adjacent to the ambulance station being put up for sale). It will be surrounded by further nearby Community Ambulance Stations in areas of the city previously without a station; including Woodgate Valley, Northfield, Highgate, Ladywood and Kings Norton. By having our ambulance crews based at a greater number of stations, we will be closer to the patients and able to respond more quickly to medical emergencies. Work continues to establish even more community ambulance stations. Despite this increase in the number of sites, the amount spent on estates is significantly reduced.

 

‘Make Ready’ was implemented by the former Staffordshire Ambulance Service fifteen years ago, making it one of the most successful ambulance services with some of the fastest response times in England. 

 

The Make Ready programme involves the creation of 24/7 fleet maintenance hubs where dedicated teams of Ambulance Fleet Assistants prepare, service and maintain the fleet of ambulances.

 

Oncoming ambulance crews collect their ‘made-ready’ vehicle and go to Community Ambulance Stations from where they respond to 999 calls.

 

The aim of the hubs is to cut down on ambulance crew ‘downtime’; time when the crew are dealing with issues such as cleaning their vehicle or restocking – time when they are not able to respond to medical emergencies.

 

‘Make Ready’ is also proven to significantly reduce the waste of out-of-date drugs and supplies.  It also reduces spending on aged and expensive ambulance station buildings. The money saved is channelled into frontline ambulance provision.

 

The Trust is now rolling the system out across the region.

 

Three fleet maintenance ‘hubs’ are being created which will serve Birmingham; at Erdington, Northfield and West Bromwich.

 

The ‘Make Ready’ system is expected to be fully in place in Birmingham next year.

 

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